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Not dead

Journal Entry: Tue Feb 15, 2011, 5:26 AM



Wow, first submissions in over a year!!
Everyone, I'm aliiiiive! :P

Although I'm probably not gonna be any more active, I just wanted you to know I'm doing great. Svante is soon 2.5 years and offcourse he's a bundle of joy!

How are you all?





Hospital by Myana   silo by Myana



journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue

ArtisanCraft Group

Journal Entry: Fri Dec 11, 2009, 11:59 AM



Groups

As you know by now, the new shiney Group-system is in BETA now and lots and lots of clubs are converted to it.

:iconartisancraft: ArtisanCraft has successfully converted to a group and I was delighted to be asked by MyntKat, who is handling the wheel on that ship now, if I wanted to be part of the club as co-admin again. Of ocurse! I will try to be a little more active, both on the club and on my personal account.

I've only played with the group a little, but man - I love it! The things I've seen is making the life of a group-admin soooo much easier. Way to go, tech team of dA! We salute you!! :heart:







Recent AC fav's

Mechanical Flash Key No7-16GB by back2root 17th carving by vankuilenburg in the box by Santani Marilyn Monroe Felting Poster by FeltAlive Looooong necklace 2 by ellyloo Natural edge bowl in Robinia by BNEP The Fight by charlie1101 :thumb145342911: Spexton Starburst Cuff by Spexton



journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue
The blueprint of... is an article series in which we’re taking a closer look at an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3




Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3 Red Tailed Hawk by Bagheera3 Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3


First off, please introduce yourself?


My name is Bill Douglas and I live in Ontario, Canada. I am 68 years old and I started carving as a hobby, 12 years ago.


Please explain what we are viewing.


This is a red-tailed hawk which I carved from tupelo wood. It is approximately 1/4 life-size. I made it in 2006. It is painted with acrylic paint.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


I start with a pattern of what I want to carve and draw it on top and side of the piece of wood I am going to use (usually tupelo). I then use a band saw to rough cut it. I then use rotary tools and the patter to shape it. Using a variety of bits, I carve, shape, and texture, the bird or animal. Using a wood burner, I do further texturing of the feathers (or fur). The primaries and secondaries and coverlets only are burned. The rest of the body feathers are stoned (a special bit) and burned. I form the legs from wire and putty and build the habitat from wood and sheet brass (leaves).

Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3 Red Tailed Hawk by Bagheera3 Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3

What tools did you use?


I created my own little studio (wife's name for my workroom) in our basement where I do my work.


What was your inspiration in creating this?


I like carving birds of prey and this bird is common in our area.


How much time did it take you to make this?


It took about 60 hours from start to finish spread over 10 weeks.

Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3 Red Tailed Hawk by Bagheera3 Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating this?


I did not encounter any real problem with this particular bird. It is very important to have good reference pictures which I usually find on the internet.


Are you happy with the result?


I am pleased with the results.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


We have a friend who took up carving and then decided to teach classes in the techniques. We have formed a club and by going weekly and branching out into mammals or new birds, we are always learning new skills and techniques and better ways of doing things. Having proper tools and paint brushes are important. Approximately a dozen people take part.

This summer we visited the Wye Marsh where they have an area with birds of prey. I was able to get some good close up pictures of several owls and hawks. Mostly I have to rely on pictures from books or the internet.

Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3 Red Tailed Hawk by Bagheera3 Red Tailed Hawk 2 by Bagheera3

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


The pictures I put on deviant art, I take on my digital camera.


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


Anyone who has a sincere interest in this hobby, should give it a try. One important piece of equipment needed is a visor with a magnifying lens.


Are you selling your work?


At the moment, I have not offered any of my pieces for sale.
I have, however, donated several pieces to our annual church auction and have given several as gifts to relatives.

As I run out of space, I am considering maybe offering some for sale.

Red Tailed Hawk 3 by Bagheera3 Chipmunk 3 by Bagheera3 Miniature Great Blue Heron by Bagheera3 Painted Turtle 4 by Bagheera3 Sharp-Shinned Hawk2 by Bagheera3 Grizzley Bear 2 by Bagheera3 Cedar Waxwing 2 by Bagheera3 Golden-crowned Kinglet 3 by Bagheera3

Thank you Bagheera3 for participating and taking the time to answer my questions!
//Myana

I'd love to receive suggestions for the next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien by Spippo
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle by ART-fromthe-HEART
The blueprint of... 30 full view by vankuilenburg
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring by LaughingScarab
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon by Richi89
The blueprint of... Leather corset by tupali
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor by farmerownia
The blueprint of... corset with gussets by crissycatt
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08 by UniquelyYours
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1 by dollmaker88
The blueprint of... Tsuru by merimask
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts by DuckTapeBandit
The blueprint of... Snekkja by Thorleifr
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited by StephaniePride
The blueprint of... More Vessels by ellyloo
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle by Adella
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box by Sliceofcake
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake by Dragonsanddaffodils
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant by inchworm
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA
The blueprint of... Armor by flintlockprivateer
The blueprint of... Shrimp by YAGGOB
The blueprint of... Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio
The blueprint of... Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour
The blueprint of... Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay
The blueprint of... Wibble pot 003 by alex190381
The blueprint of... Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan
The blueprint of... Criptex  by the-metalchemist


The blueprint of... is an article series in which we’re taking a closer look at an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Criptex by the-metalchemist




Criptex by the-metalchemist Criptex by the-metalchemist Criptex by the-metalchemist


First off, please introduce yourself?


My name is Jake Wakefield. I'm a graphic designer and illustrator from Fort Collins, Colorado.
You can find me at the-metalchemist


Please explain what we are viewing.


“The Cryptex” is a metalsmithing piece, specifically coppersmithing. It is a cylinder that is about eight inches tall and has a diameter of about two inches. There are really only two parts to the cryptex. On the outside is the copper shell, I can't remember the gauge thickness right off the top of my head. The shell is only covered with a basic patina.

The interior is the interesting bit. The interior is a slightly smaller cylinder, a little smaller in length and diameter than the exterior so it can rotate freely in the shell. The interior is cut with a maze pattern. The piece is primarily copper with a bit of silver solder here and there.

It is meant to be a puzzle. It can only be opened by navigating a pin hidden inside through the maze. It can only be opened by completing the maze.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


First there was the design. The original cryptex design could be easily described as absolutely over the top. Instead of just the maze that made it to the final version, there were five or six layers. One layer had eight basic keys that would open eight basic locks. I worked out a very, very simple lock that could have worked. I can't even remember the other layers without digging up the old sketches.

We had to have all of our designs checked by out professor. Her response was something like “Are you freaking crazy? theres no way you will get this done in time.” She was absolutely right. I might have had the time if I had dropped all my other classes and started eating and sleeping in the metalsmithing shop. I simplified the design to feature only the maze.

The shell's construction is as simple as it looks. I went over to a local hardware/plumbing store and bought myself a nice length of copper tubing. It cut a lot of time off trying to form it myself and meant more time for me to spend on the interior.

The interior maze was a completely different story. I created the maze that would be cut into the interior cylinder on my computer. I ended up with two interiors built in the end. The first one I attempted to use a dremel tool to carve out the path. I figured it would be quick and easy. It also looked horrible and messy. The second was cut out with a saw. It took forever but ended with a lot cleaner lines in the maze.

After the interior and exteriors were made there was a little bit of soldering to attach the guide pin and the pin back.

Criptex by the-metalchemist Criptex by the-metalchemist Criptex by the-metalchemist

What tools did you use?


All of us students had to use the college's metalsmithing workshop. I think I was in the dorms at the time, so there wasn't really any where else to work other than there. The list of tools for this project was small. A jeweler's saw, a rubber forming mallet, and a soldering torch. That was it. Well that and saw blades. Anyone who has used a jeweler's saw knows that the blades break all the time. It's a pretty regular thing. That's why places sell big packs with 20 or so blades in them. I lost count on how many packs of blades I went through.


What was your inspiration in creating this?


The first bit of inspiration came from my professor. We were given a theme for each project. The theme for this project was “hidden meaning.” So I decided to do something that kept a message or some hidden thing inside of it. Not only would the item contained be hidden, but I wanted the path to find it to be hidden as well. “The DaVinci Code” was big at the time and I liked the idea of the “Cryptex” the little cylinder that holds a hidden clue. That's where I started.

The name “Cryptex” comes from “The DaVinci Code.” The word is a combination of “cryptography” and “codex.” It more or less means “Code Scroll.” I think it mentions that in the book or maybe I just saw that definition on-line somewhere. Dan Brown combined two word as well as two ideas when he imagined the cryptex. I did something similar and formed my own combo.

The first part was created from an old roman cypher method. A message would be written on a medium that was wrapped around a dowel. When the message was unwrapped, the message was scrambled as one long jumble of letters. Pretty basic. The second part was the labyrinth / maze, which doesn't need much of an explanation.

I took the maze, wrapped it around a cylinder. It didn't seem too cool to me at the time, that's why I added so many more layers to it. I guess it should really be called something more like “Labypher” or “Cyphrinth”.


How much time did it take you to make this?


I think we were given around two weeks on each project. I just remember being in the metalsmithing studio late more than a few times when the deadline was getting close.

Criptex by the-metalchemist Criptex by the-metalchemist Criptex by the-metalchemist

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating this?


After cutting the entire piece I had to form it and solder it into a cylinder. I made the walls that were meant to be soldered too wide. They would heat up slower than the small walls of the maze. I ended up melting one of the walls of the maze a bit. Luckily, it was in an easy to fix area.

I also found out that copper might not have been the best choice for the project. The parts where the maze connected to the support areas are weak, and adding extra supports would have meant blocking major parts of the maze. I ended up getting a B on the project because of that.


Are you happy with the result?


I am happy with it. If I could go back and change anything, I would go back and make it out of something a bit stronger like brass or bronze. If I ever get the chance, I think it would be good time to try and make the full version I originally sketched out.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


I graduated from Colorado State University. I got my BFA with a Concentration in Graphic Design there. I took a few metalsmithing classes there to fill in some credits with something that looked interesting and fun. (Which is was, I recommend it wholeheartedly.) If it weren't for my counselor labeling it as a, “Huge and unnecessary waste of time,” I would have gotten a second concentration in metalsmithing. I liked it that much. But anyways, I learned just about everything I know about metalwork from the Metalsmithing Department there and Mrs. Haley Bates, my professor.

Criptex by the-metalchemist Criptex by the-metalchemist Criptex by the-metalchemist

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


I didn't take any of the photos for my metal work. They were all taken by my professor, who had a lot more experience photographing metal than any of us students. She took photos for all of us to use and for her to use as slides for future classes.

As far as tips for presenting, I could ramble on even more about design and photography and so on. But just make sure the piece is clean, on a nice backdrop, everything is spelled right and there isn't anything embarrassing in the reflection on the metal.

As far as in-person presentation. All the advice I can give you is to never let delicate metalwork that requires a bit of problem solving skills into the hands of a drunken party guest. It won't end well.


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


Well, first off, know the difference between working with metals like copper, silver or even gold and working with iron or steel. The later of the two is in the realm of blacksmithing and requires a lot of very expensive torches, tools and tanks of gas. It's a totally different craft. If you are looking to get your feet wet with metalsmithing, head over to your craft store. The jewelry section is a good place for beginners.

If you are looking for something more in depth, some cities, colleges, community colleges or even hobby shops host seminars that can give you some good hands on experience.

Finally, know the limits. If you want to make some nice simple jewelry or metal projects, check out a few books, cruise the internet or experiment on your own. If you are looking to make something that requires heating or melting metals, I would definitely recommend a class. If you are looking to make something like a sword, find someone who knows what they are doing and apprentice under them, if possible.


Are you selling your work?


Not at the moment. I've gotten a lot of requests about making copies of the Cryptex, but it isn't an option until I get enough supplies to have a usable workshop. The same goes for metalsmithing commissions, unfortunately. However, I'm always available as a graphic designer and illustrator. So if you're looking for some advice on a metalsmithing design or want help sketching something out, I might be able to oblige. Just shoot me a note on DeviantArt or email me at Jake.Wakefield@gmail.com

Seraph's Spear by the-metalchemist Seraph Ring by the-metalchemist Helmet by the-metalchemist Gourd by the-metalchemist Vice Torq by the-metalchemist Portrait by the-metalchemist Artifact 1 by the-metalchemist Metals Poster by the-metalchemist


Thank you the-metalchemist for participating and taking the time to answer my questions!
//Myana

I'd love to receive suggestions for the next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien by Spippo
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle by ART-fromthe-HEART
The blueprint of... 30 full view by vankuilenburg
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring by LaughingScarab
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon by Richi89
The blueprint of... Leather corset by tupali
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor by farmerownia
The blueprint of... corset with gussets by crissycatt
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08 by UniquelyYours
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1 by dollmaker88
The blueprint of... Tsuru by merimask
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts by DuckTapeBandit
The blueprint of... Snekkja by Thorleifr
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited by StephaniePride
The blueprint of... More Vessels by ellyloo
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle by Adella
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box by Sliceofcake
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake by Dragonsanddaffodils
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant by inchworm
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA
The blueprint of... Armor by flintlockprivateer
The blueprint of... Shrimp by YAGGOB
The blueprint of... Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio
The blueprint of... Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour
The blueprint of... Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay
The blueprint of... Wibble pot 003 by alex190381
The blueprint of... Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan

New Artisan Crafts Galleries!!

Journal Entry: Sun Nov 8, 2009, 12:30 PM



It's here!

Artisan Crafts Gallery - Changes & Additions


Hell yeah!!!


The Blueprint of...

I hope you've read my last article in the Blueprint serie!
The blueprint of... Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1



Please send me suggestions on deviations you want to see dissected






Recent AC fav's

Snow Queen by WearableByDesign Mega Complex Origami Dragons by origami-artist-galen :thumb141746957: The rag-snowflakes by kittyvane Diamond Mother by carpe0diem Smart Night Design Jddarkdeath by GlassArtists neck corset III by crissycatt :thumb142722149: Pink Faerie Wings by Firefly-Path Pine Cone by ou8nrtist2



journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue
The blueprint of... is an article series in which we’re taking a closer look at an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan




Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 59 Special part 2 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan


First off, please introduce yourself?


My name is Hakan SAĞLAM, I was born 6 April 1986 in Antalya, Turkey. I am a student at Eastern Mediterranean University of Architecture 2. I left my engineering education at half the map and I have chosen this profession. the right decision for myself I think. img36.imageshack.us/img36/5135…


Please explain what we are viewing.


I'm sick fan of Lord of the Rings. I share images of work, which is 3 parts of the Lord of the Rings - Return of the King from the movie, 3 Witnessed the greatest era of war is the fortress Minas Tirith. Width 75 cm, length 90 cm, height 80 cm. I got neither a plan, nor the drawings of the castle belonging to the net is no information, with the whole movie from the extended DVD scenes to take pictures of the building, and 1 / 720 scale size shrinks any one detail I'm trying to practice. Without the project, but the lighting of the castle had already finished the configuration from top to bottom have to do to keep the light cord. As a result, more than 3 years are a time when the project is still not complete, because, just like in the summer months to the project can continue to be another negative factor ...


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


When I first started, you can create a skeleton Polyfoam with plaster and sanding with the fix I tried to support it. Components, creating plaster forms geomertik vote, but as I have prepared a study that was very troublesome, it was not a permanent solution. With a small cardboard model I tried to make the track 1-2 and became quite successful. This is made of plaster on top of tracks I've canceled, and I started to work on with cardboard.

Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 59 Special part 2 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan

What tools did you use?


I do not have a workshop at home in my room working. In my room door width 78 cm, thus the max. Width of 75 cm will be started to work ... :)


What was your inspiration in creating this?


This is the reason I started to model a complete fiasco. Gift set comes with Extended the size of the tiny fortress Minas Tirith, and I did not know I do better than that he started. 1 year after a friend of mine sent me his castle as a gift and a complete shock when I arrived. In so small a figure to be much detail to me you had an incredible shock. After the event already in the collection I have a passion for ... :)


How much time did it take you to make this?


6 months after I started working in research and preparation.

Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 59 Special part 2 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating this?


Of course, this model 3 I once, and they've destroyed the first 2 phases at a time instead of rebuilding with a new method was Developed. I am currently moving in a solid line, the only missing my free time ...


Are you happy with the result?


Current stage, very happy, I said I would do no such thing could also be better made, is already 3 Was more than pleased with my stage ...


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


I think I have in my genes, my grandfather was a carpenter, my grandfather also draws a very nice picture, I like that I think the only good feature :D

Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 59 Special part 2 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 58 Special part 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


I have 1 photo with the model I've afraid,

What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


This sort of work the greatest need for patience, is doing may be wrong track, a tiny place you can cut wrong, at that moment to your nerves and your possession in your hand 2 cm track, two fingers between your &#61514 should crush this question many answers can be given, but my references of my work took them try to do something I have many friends deviantart ta. I'm trying to help themselves at every opportunity, I would answer questions. I know nothing secret or supernatural-like ability. Bo really be willing to issue any kind of support from my friends I'll give me enough to reach ...
I used materials: cardboard models, Polyfoam, gypsum, transparencies, adhesive, matte plastic wall paint (black and white) and white LED lights, telephone cable,


Are you selling your work?


If a serious buyer interest, makes sense if a bid can consider selling a very simple picture, millions of dollars are sold, my eyes I is not in high numbers in the middle of course, but a serious effort in question, does it give at the expense of those not ... :)

Minas Tirith 60 Special part 3 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 54 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 49 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan   Minas Tirith 32 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith 12 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Minas Tirith Measures 1 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan   Minas Tirith 6 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Argonath Bookends 2 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan Meditation home model 2 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan The Royal Library 3 by Minas-Tirith-Hakan


Thank you Minas-Tirith-Hakan for participating and taking the time to answer my questions!
//Myana

I'd love to receive suggestions for the next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien by Spippo
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle by ART-fromthe-HEART
The blueprint of... 30 full view by vankuilenburg
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring by LaughingScarab
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon by Richi89
The blueprint of... Leather corset by tupali
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor by farmerownia
The blueprint of... corset with gussets by crissycatt
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08 by UniquelyYours
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1 by dollmaker88
The blueprint of... Tsuru by merimask
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts by DuckTapeBandit
The blueprint of... Snekkja by Thorleifr
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited by StephaniePride
The blueprint of... More Vessels by ellyloo
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle by Adella
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box by Sliceofcake
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake by Dragonsanddaffodils
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant by inchworm
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA
The blueprint of... Armor by flintlockprivateer
The blueprint of... Shrimp by YAGGOB
The blueprint of... Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio
The blueprint of... Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour
The blueprint of... Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay
The blueprint of... Wibble pot 003 by alex190381

The blueprint of... is an article series in which we’re taking a closer look at an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Wibble pot 003 by alex190381




Wibble pot 003 by alex190381 Wibble pot 003 by alex190381 Wibble pot 003 by alex190381

First off, please introduce yourself?


My names Alex, I'm 28 and from the North of England, I grew up here and although its beautiful, my fiancee and I are moving to London to complete the rest of my Architecture training. Prior to my architecture training I undertook a Bachelors Degree in Homewares/furniture (3 years) which is where these ceramic products were developed. After the degree I opened a small pottery, which lasted for a couple of years and I sold my work through galleries and small craft shops around the UK. I haven't done any pottery for a long time now, as I worked for a furniture company and now work for an Architecture practice, but someday I'd like to get back on a wheel and do work for my own enjoyment. Even so, my partner says I'm a better architect than I am a potter!


Please explain what we are viewing.


This is a form that I developed on my bachelor course as part of a series of porcelain vessels and lights. They were based on the the theory that porcelain retains a "memory" of its previous form, like some plastics. Some of the forms were made by hand to reflect the forms that were in theory possible. This "wibble pot" however was a direct result of an accident in the kiln when it was fired to a temperature higher than usual. The forms were developed to make a viable product from this interesting process.
It has been likened to a stack of popadoms, tape worms, whirlwinds, the inside of an ant hill, a parking ramp and many other things but is actually two sets of graduating hoops made from very thin porcelain, over-fired in a kiln and then joined together with a low-fired glaze and then fired again.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


Its actually a very simple process. I rolled out 2 sheets of porcelain until they were as thin as possible (1-2mm). I then scribed concentric circles on to each with a converted compass, one circle had a slightly smaller diameter than the other to provide an overlap in the finished assembly. Then it was a case of carefully seperating the layers out without deforming them and letting them dry. After the rings dried, they were laid out on the kiln bed and then fired beyond the recommended temperature for porcelain. The higher temperature meant that the rings lifted, twisted and warped in a variety of ways. The resulting deformed shapes were then sprayed with a low firing transparent glaze and stacked, one concentric circle interleaved with the other until a teetering whirlwind form was achieved. The whole thing was carefully placed into the kiln and fired. and thats about it, I tried many variations on the technique, but this remained the best.

Wibble pot 003 by alex190381 Wibble pot 003 by alex190381 Wibble pot 003 by alex190381

What tools did you use?


Most of them were completed at the pottery I owned or the university workshops.
Rolling pin, converted compass (scalpel blade instead of pencil), kiln, oven, glaze bin.


What was your inspiration in creating this?


The original idea for the range came from my obsession with sinuous curves, landscape contours, parallel and repeating lines and the technical side of craft. So there aren't really any links apart from a google search for maps and any etchings or technical drawings you've ever seen.


How much time did it take you to make this?


Probably a week or so, although I made them in batches as the loss at all points of the manufacturing process was so high, so its difficult to tell.

Wibble pot 003 by alex190381 Wibble pot 003 by alex190381 Wibble pot 003 by alex190381

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating this?


Nothing unexpected apart form the birth of the process itself. The only problems tended to be the fragility and as mentioned before the amount of breakages, misfires and getting the thickness of the glaze right to adhere to the pre fired rings. I had to heat the rings up in a small oven to get the glaze to stick in the end.


Are you happy with the result?


I love them, although I'm always frustrated by its lack of true function.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


Mostly at university, although there was a lot of experimentation and reading that needed to be done when dealing with your own equipment. I suspect I'll have to start learning again when I finally get my hands back in the mud.

Wibble pot 003 by alex190381 Wibble pot 003 by alex190381 Wibble pot 003 by alex190381

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


These were difficult to photograph so I just concentrated on using a black matt background and some strong lighting to get the best out of the convoluted shapes


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


Experiment, and don't be scared of mistakes. Also, pottery isn't just about the raw clay, its about all the little processes that go to make the finished piece. You could make something beautiful or ugly just by changing the smallest variable. Thats the most exciting thing for me.


Are you selling your work?


I used to but not anymore, I only have a few left scattered around friends and family, so they're staying firmly where they are!

Workshop Ceramics 002 by alex190381 Wibble Pot 006 by alex190381 Sheets 001 by alex190381 Wibble pot 002 by alex190381 Site Plan by alex190381 Workshop Ceramics 005 by alex190381 1:200 Section by alex190381 Wibble Pot 001 by alex190381

Thank you alex190381 for participating and taking the time to answer my questions!
//Myana

I'd love to receive suggestions for the next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien by Spippo
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle by ART-fromthe-HEART
The blueprint of... 30 full view by vankuilenburg
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring by LaughingScarab
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon by Richi89
The blueprint of... Leather corset by tupali
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor by farmerownia
The blueprint of... corset with gussets by crissycatt
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08 by UniquelyYours
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1 by dollmaker88
The blueprint of... Tsuru by merimask
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts by DuckTapeBandit
The blueprint of... Snekkja by Thorleifr
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited by StephaniePride
The blueprint of... More Vessels by ellyloo
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle by Adella
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box by Sliceofcake
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake by Dragonsanddaffodils
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant by inchworm
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA
The blueprint of... Armor by flintlockprivateer
The blueprint of... Shrimp by YAGGOB
The blueprint of... Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio
The blueprint of... Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour
The blueprint of... Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay

Alive and lurking

Journal Entry: Mon Sep 28, 2009, 11:46 AM



Update

Time flies, but we're alive and well. Svante soon turns 1 year old. Holy crap, it has gone so fast! He's such a wonderful, cheerful and playful little boy. He's almost walking, speaks a few word I understand and a lot I don't understand, got 4 teeth and is a bundle of joy! :heart:

I'm working halftime now, and really love getting back to woodwork again - and the feeling of coming home after a days of work and meet a smiling and kissing Svante at the door is amazing!!


I really don't have much time to spend on the computer or dA but I do log in and try to be up to date on things but it's hard. So tell me, how are you?


The Blueprint of...

Sorry for the lack of Blueprint articles, I've got several blueprint victims I'm still awating answers on.


Please send me suggestions on deviations you want to see dissected! Like... now!!



Most recent one: The blueprint of... Lulu - FFX 10.






Recent AC fav's

Ayame Sohma from Fruits Basket by taeliac Tidal Incense Burner by Frost-indri Double Exposure 2 by ellyloo DC Pheonix...size matters by ART-fromthe-HEART :thumb138129015: Fall Berry Pixie by fairiesnest Felt flower choker teal-brown by Amaltheea Tribal Underbust Corset by Trinitynavar Artemis - design miror,2009 by ayhantomak



journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue

New gallery descriptions!

Journal Entry: Wed Aug 26, 2009, 11:40 AM



Yep, yep!!

Kitten-of-Woe is a hardworking woman and has renewed the gallery descriptions (not subscriptions! :rofl:) for the Artisan Crafts gallery.

Curious? Take a look here: Please see my journal page [link] and read the newly reworked AC gallery descriptions in my sidebar. Advice/suggestions welcome. :poke:  and do let her know what you think!


:whisper: There are some enteriley new galleries and subcats there!


I'm happy like a little girl on christmas eve!
I'm sooooo glad to finally see this happen :dance: :boogie: :w00t:



The Blueprint of...

I hope you didn't miss the latest article in the blueprint serie: The blueprint of... Lulu - FFX 10.

Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay


Please send me suggestions on deviations you want to see dissected! Like... now!!






Recent AC fav's

Abundant Hope by ellyloo :thumb134231629: Cocoon II by Lapsus-Clavis Gold Bars Pendant by Spexton Chocolate Banana Nut Muffin by Sliceofcake White leather necklace. by julishland :thumb133673034:



journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue
The blueprint of... is an article series in which we're taking a closer look at an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay




Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay Lulu - Close Up by yayacosplay Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay


First off, please introduce yourself.


My name is Yaya, and I am a costume designer and model currently based in Atlanta, GA. I am originally from China, though I've lived in Germany for several years as well - so culturally, I am a complete mutt! I have been designing and making costumes for 10 years now, starting off just as a hobbyist and cosplay enthusiast. In the last few years however, my love for cosplay has turned into a Profession, and now I travel to over 20 conventions per year, worldwide, to teach workshops and panels, judge contests, meet and greet friends and fans in costume, and offer my original cosplay accessories for sale inside dealer halls. I still love making costumes for personal enjoyment, though my free time is severely limited during the busy season of each year (May - October). I'm slowly getting through the hectic convention season this year, so look for some big new upcoming costumes on my DA!


Please explain what we are viewing.


This is the Artisan Craft Deviation I submitted with photos of my Lulu costume - a recreation of the character from the "Final Fantasy X" video game. From the first moment I laid eyes on her design in September 2001, I wanted to have this outfit. To me, Lulu was the most intriguing and captivating Final Fantasy character I had ever seen, in looks and personality. I started gathering materials that week and made the costume in a month, in time for Ani_Magic 2001.
The photos you see were taken in a graveyard in Atlanta, GA, by Cosplay.com Administrator Kyle Johnsen. He invited me to be the 2nd Featured Cosplayer on the website in the summer of 2004, and this costume was a part of that feature.


Can you describe for a layman how it's made?


Of course! First of all I would like to note that I took the liberty to add a personal touch to Lulu's character design in order to bring the costume to life. At the point of this project, I had been sewing costumes for a while and while making something accurately down to the last detail can be fun, it left little to no room for my own creativity. To this day, you will find details on my costume that give the design a little more depth and texture and make them stand out a bit more.
Onto making Lulu: I looked for a while for the grey fabric and found a beautiful rubber coated upholstery pleather that had a sheen and weight to it. I made my own pattern for the skirt and sleeves, and altered a historical corset pattern for the fur trimmed corset. I sewed the basic pieces together and made sure they fit and attached right. I bought a fur stole on eBay and cut it up, re-lined it, and sewed it to the corset which is also lined and has grey trim hand stitched on the seams. I made the little criss-cross belts for the sleeves by covering nylon straps with pleather and putting silver buckles on them. Overall, the belts were the most difficult part to work on, as I had to figure out how to attach them to the skirt without pulling everything out of shape and being too heavy. In the end I made a separate panel of belts that snaps around my waist and is supported. I probably bought 50+ leather belts at all the thrift stores I could raid lol.
Even though the belts were a pain, making the jewelry/hair accessories and embellishing the costume took the most time - over two weeks. I made the four hair sticks out of a variety of materials such as wooden sticks, wire, model magic, sheet metal, lace, and beads. The necklaces were also fun to make, and I sculpted each of the purple disk beads. Painting the jewelry and hair sticks took over 2 days alone as I kept going back with layers of paint to achieve the gradient effect. I used a wig for this costume, and lots of hair extensions which I had to braid and sew together.
Lastly, I did a lot of beading for this costume, such as adding my hand beaded original trim onto the corset to make it pop more, and a ton of glass and gold beads in the hair braids. I also hand-painted all the lace trim on the dress and sleeves and sewed them individually on, creating a pattern inspired by Lulu's character design artwork.

Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay Lulu - Close Up by yayacosplay Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay

What tools did you use?


I had a sewing machine and a serger at my disposal, and a plethora of random materials and tools (see construction notes).


What was your inspiration in creating this?


Lulu's awesome character design first of all, and I also wanted to challenge myself by working with new materials and techniques.


How long did it take you to make this?


About 4 weeks of working multiple hours per day. And about $300 in materials if I remember correctly.

Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay Lulu - Close Up by yayacosplay Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating this?


There were definitely experiment days lol. The belt took a trial run before I got it to hold up right, and I had to make everything longer to fit me with 5 inch heels on. Since Lulu is much taller than me haha. Also, the pleather started peeling at stress points after a few conventions so it didn't look very shiny or new anymore sadly.


Are you happy with the result?


I am 90% happy with the finished costume. It has definitely been one of my best received costumes, but construction wise I can see places where I could have improved, if I had had the knowledge I have now. A couple of years ago I was really in a financial bind and got a great offer on the Lulu costume, so I sold it to a new happy owner. Since then I've been thinking of making another Lulu costume, and do the corset with steel boning this time and make the belt structure lighter and the skirt out of a more stress-resistant material.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


I am completely self-taught - I had no clue how to sew before getting into cosplay, but when I saw other people having fun dressed up at Anime Expo 1999, I really wanted to learn. A friend of mine sat me in front of a sewing machine for a couple of hours and showed me how to use a pattern and I went on from there. Styling wigs, making props, jewelry, wings.. all this I learned by doing, making mistakes, correcting them, and so forth. But to this day I have the most fun with the creation process of cosplay, and I have so much I want to learn, and skills that I want to hone.

Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay Lulu - Close Up by yayacosplay Lulu - FFX 10 by yayacosplay

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


I do a lot of photoshoots with varies friends, professional photographers and amateurs alike. I knew fairly early on that I wanted to make the effort to take nice looking photos of my costumes, because it is also part of cosplay and what makes it so much fun. Re-creating a feeling, look or scene from the source in your own photos helps showcase the costume and make the character come to life. I also believe in the importance of makeup and correct hair for your costumes, and encourage everyone who wants to cosplay to not only work on their sewing skills but also play with makeup and wigs and seek out photographers to photo shoots with. There are so many out there who love to take photos of cosplayers. It will make all the difference in the presentation of your costumes.


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


Be patient and enjoy the process of making a costume. Iron open your seams, make sure the stitches are straight, cut off the extra thread. These little things are vital to making a finished costume look nice. Rushing to meet a deadline will only frustrate you and take the fun out of making the costume, and there are so many conventions these days that your chances of wearing a costume are a plenty. Also, do research and read tutorials on what you're wanting to make, don't take shortcuts or blindly start on a new technique you've never tested before.
And of course, always remember to have fun!


Are you selling your work?


I am doing limited commissions for feather angel wings of all sizes, and I have an online store with my original cosplay accessories for Sale. You can find more info on the angel wings on my website at www.angelicstar.net and my store link is yayahan.bigcartel.com. Fans and collectors can also purchase signed 8x12 photo prints of me on my website www.angelicstar.net.
Aside from that, keep an eye on my Appearance schedule and come say hi if you see me at a convention!

Lulu - FFX 10: Additional pics by yayacosplay Black Magic by yayacosplay

More photos of the costume:
Photos by Meg Hanson: angelicstar.net/cos-images/lul… angelicstar.net/cos-images/lul…
Photos by Kyle Johnsen: angelicstar.net/cos-images/lul… angelicstar.net/cos-images/lul… angelicstar.net/modeling/kyle/… angelicstar.net/modeling/kyle/… angelicstar.net/modeling/kyle/…

Steampunk Madam at Ohayocon 09 by yayacosplay Belldandy - Ah My Goddess by yayacosplay Intergalactic Alien Huntress by yayacosplay Midnight Wings by yayacosplay The Tea Room Scene by yayacosplay Empyrean Eyes by yayacosplay Cleopatra the Golden Queen by yayacosplay Disney's Mulan by yayacosplay


Thank you yayacosplay for participating and taking the time to answer my questions!
//Myana

I'd love to receive suggestions for the next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien by Spippo
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle by ART-fromthe-HEART
The blueprint of... 30 full view by vankuilenburg
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring by LaughingScarab
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon by Richi89
The blueprint of... Leather corset by tupali
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor by farmerownia
The blueprint of... corset with gussets by crissycatt
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08 by UniquelyYours
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1 by dollmaker88
The blueprint of... Tsuru by merimask
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts by DuckTapeBandit
The blueprint of... Snekkja by Thorleifr
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited by StephaniePride
The blueprint of... More Vessels by ellyloo
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle by Adella
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box by Sliceofcake
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake by Dragonsanddaffodils
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant by inchworm
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA
The blueprint of... Armor by flintlockprivateer
The blueprint of... Shrimp by YAGGOB
The blueprint of... Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio
The blueprint of... Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour

Winner of Best Wood Worker!!

Journal Entry: Sat Aug 15, 2009, 4:28 AM



I'm so honoured!

I'm the winner of the Best Wood Worker at :iconthedeviantawards: TheDeviantAwards!!

Wow! What an honour! :faint:
Thank you, thank you, thank you!! :heart:
See all June 2009 Winners


"Clean, geometric lines are usually found in `Myana's work. She makes modern but beautifully made things..."





The Blueprint of...

I hope you didn't miss the latest article inte this serie  The blueprint of... Gothic Armour - Full View.

Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour

Please send me suggestions on deviations you want to see dissected!







journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue
The blueprint of... is an article serie where we’re taking a closer look on an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour



Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour Gothic Gauntlet by Ageofarmour Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour


First off, please introduce yourself?


My name is William Hurt. I am a (need to do the math)... 30 something... armourer from a small town in the hills above Palm Springs, California.

William in Gothic armour by Ageofarmour

I started avidly making armour in the early 90's as I wanted to have something to wear when I proposed to my, then, girlfriend. We never ended up marrying but I did find a new love in making armour :)


Please explain what we are viewing.


This is a suit of armour made from 20 to 14 gauge 1018 steel, brass and leather in the German Gothic style of the late 1400s. Articulated and wearable, the armour stands a little over 6 foot tall and weighs approximately 65lbs.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


I gather as many photos of the antique inspiration as I can find. Then I start making patterns of the larger pieces based on what I see in the photos. Patterning is difficult to explain and is a bit of a “Zen” process. The patterns are fairly basic and often need to be trimmed and refined during the project.

I rough form the steel using various hammers, stakes, anvils and wooden stumps. Once the largest plates have the correct, overall shape I planish the entire surface with a light, polished, flat faced hammer to even out any undulation and smooth away the rough hammer marks. I then pattern and form the pieces that connect to the main plates.

Forming armour by Ageofarmour

After all the plates in a component (for example: a breastplate/backplate and waist area assembly) are formed, I start working on the decorative elements. I place the plates on top of a large, blunted chisel then hammer recesses on either side of the chisel to form the fluting. The piercing is done by punching small starter holes in the armour then carving away designs in the steel using jeweler's files.

Fluting Armour by Ageofarmour Decorative armour piercework by Ageofarmour

When all the parts have been formed, fit and decorated I sand away any surface imperfections then polish the armour. At this point the armour can be assembled using rivets at pivoting points and internal leather strips for articulation. The last stage is to make the spring latches, grommets, buckles and other hardware that is needed to make the armour wearable.

Gothic Vambrace by Ageofarmour

Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour Gothic Gauntlet by Ageofarmour Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour

What tools did you use?


I have a very small work area about the size of a single car garage. Though it is a little cramped, the shop offers me enough room for all the tools I use regularly.

I try to use historical tools (or their historical approximate) whenever practical with a few exceptions. I cut the basic shape of the steel using a band saw, rather than a shear, as I find it a little easier. I use power sanders and buffers for the finishing and polishing. I would much rather use the giant, waterwheel powered buffers that appear illustrated in medieval manuscripts but, living in the desert, I don't have a good water source near by hehe.

Armour tools by Ageofarmour

Those power tools aside, the bulk of my work involves using a few anvils, stakes and various hammers. One of my most useful tools is simply a wooden stump. It can serve as a table or a surface to hammer on like a semi-soft anvil.


What was your inspiration in creating this?


When I first tried making armour many years ago I had very little to draw from. There were fantasy paintings and movies but, while they may look good on film, they were not very comfortable or effective designs when put into practice. In addition, I had original designs of my own however, they also lacked real world functionality.

Fantasy Armour by Ageofarmour

One day a friend brought over a book about arms and armour from his library. I thumbed through a few pages and, while I was impressed with some of the designs, they seemed odd to me because my only previous exposure to armour was from movies and fantasy art. Then a picture caught my eye... A photo of the armour of Archduke Sigismund of Tyrol. The armour was spikey yet conforming. It was absolutely covered from head to toe in fluting and piercing. The armour was very ornate and regal but also gave off a sinister look of seriousness. I think my comment was “That's the coolest thing I have ever seen in my life!” I looked to my friend and said “I'm going to make that someday.” to which we both laughed.


How long time did it take you to make this?


It was probably a few years after seeing that photo that I started on this suit. I worked on it as I had free time between custom orders and after hours. If I remember correctly I started making the suit in 1995 and it was finished in 2006.

Only a few years after I began the project the armour was wearable but I continued to refine and remake portions of it as my skill improved and I saw ways of improving it. Even after it was sold I remade a few of the parts while waiting for the customers check to clear.

Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour Gothic Gauntlet by Ageofarmour Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating?


In the beginning I was intimidated by the decoration. I wasn't too concerned about my ability to get the general shape correct. As it turns out I should have reversed my focus. The decoration, while very time consuming, was not as hard as I had feared and I am fairly pleased by how that aspect turned out. I look at the photos now and cringe at the lack of subtle refinement in the shape.


Are you happy with the result?


Yes and no... I am very happy I did it. The challenge taught me a lot but I know I can do better. Some things I knew I should have done better early on but instead I decided to sacrifice them to keep the cost from becoming prohibitively expensive.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


Lots and lots of trial and error hehe. When I started making armour, prior to the modern Internet, there was essentially no information available about historical armour making. Once the armour making websites began forming, like the Armour Archive (armourarchive.org), enthusiasts were able to share and compare their findings with others. Now new armourers can spend less time with trial and error on the basic techniques giving them more time to experiment with advanced challenges.

It is exciting to see such a revival of the art. Many new, very talented armourers are emerging to help rediscover lost techniques and bring history to life.

Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour Gothic Gauntlet by Ageofarmour Gothic Armour - Full View. by Ageofarmour

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


Yes. Taking photos of the finished armour is something I look forward to through the whole project. As I am forming, ideas come about how I would like to light and photograph the armour. I have always loved the photography in Architectural Digest and often visualize product shots as if they were for a piece of jewelry or fine furniture. Unfortunately I am not nearly as skilled as the photographers who inspire me so I always miss the mark.

Photographing Armour by Ageofarmour

I once had a visit from a photographer who specialized in automobile advertising. He said the trick to photographing shiny things was to avoid any direct lighting and to rely only on reflections. He showed me a few of his sets, built in aircraft hangers, which had giant screens all around the cars. Onto these screens he projected landscapes or psychedelic patterns that the car's paint, chrome and glass would reflect. His advice was truly impressive and insightful.


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


The best tip I can offer is to have confidence and patience. By confidence I don't mean to be egotistical but rather to understand that it can be done and be done by you. I assume that is true for any art form.

I believe what stops many from making armour is that steel is very intimidating at first. It seems so unyielding. If you're confident enough to try forming metal and are patient enough to see the first project through to the end you will find a whole new world of possibilities. After that the rest is just refinement of that skill.


Are you selling your work?


Yes, I have been working as a full time armourer for about a decade and a half. It is a very meager living because of the time involved in each project, but what it lacks in money it more than makes up for in enjoyment. I am compelled to extend my thanks to the wonderful and patient customers around the world who have so kindly provided me the opportunity to work as an artist.

Embossed Gorget by Ageofarmour 17th Century Gorget by Ageofarmour Burgonet Details by Ageofarmour Burgonet and Buff by Ageofarmour

Thank you Ageofarmour for participating and taking the time to answer my question!

//Myana

I'd love to recive suggestions for next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien by Spippo
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle by ART-fromthe-HEART
The blueprint of... 30 full view by vankuilenburg
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring by LaughingScarab
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon by Richi89
The blueprint of... Leather corset by tupali
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor by farmerownia
The blueprint of... corset with gussets by crissycatt
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08 by UniquelyYours
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1 by dollmaker88
The blueprint of... Tsuru by merimask
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts by DuckTapeBandit
The blueprint of... Snekkja by Thorleifr
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited by StephaniePride
The blueprint of... More Vessels by ellyloo
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle by Adella
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box by Sliceofcake
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake by Dragonsanddaffodils
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant by inchworm
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA
The blueprint of... Armor by flintlockprivateer
The blueprint of... Shrimp by YAGGOB
The blueprint of... Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio
The blueprint of... is an article serie where we’re taking a closer look on an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio




Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio Tears of a Clown D by cdlitestudio Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio


First off, please introduce yourself?


My name is Connie D’Angelo and I am Canadian born and still live in beautiful Montreal.
Art has always been part of our lives growing up in our family. Let it be oil paintings, sketching or sculpting in mud clays, art was just a daily thing for us.
But in 2001-2002, I became interested in trying and using polymer clay, and from that day on, I have been hocked and never put it down since. It’s not just the medium I use but what comes out of it, because of it’s natural colour clay, it’s like looking at little people. When I sculpt, I became one with my art, and to be able to create something wonderful and so beautiful just did it for me. And to hear my collectors say that when they look at one of my pieces it like you can actually see them breath. What more can an artist ask for, at think at this point I know I have done my job right.


Please explain what we are viewing.


You are viewing a sculpture or you might say an art doll made out of polymer clay. She is called *Tears of a Clown* . She would be about 9 to 9 ½ doll if she would be in a standing position. She is left in her natural clay colour that I mix myself, and her body tattooing outfit has been painted to give a transparent feel, almost like a viel. She is also lightly blushed to add some shading. She has had painted makeup hair applied lock by lock and tiny lashes applied one by one.
On this one piece her outfit (body tattoo) is mostly hand painted with genesis heat paints and a little silk material was added to her wrists and neck and tip of her shoes.
Her ball is also made out of clay, left in it’s natural bone white colour with a little glitter and leafing added. She sits on two pieces of wooden blocks that have been decorated in paints crackle and silver leafing. When I create any pieces of mine, I basically work with emotions, and I pray that somehow when someone see her, she can translate my feelings to them.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


I am sure everyone works different, but this is my way or process of working.
Before I do anything I mix my own colours of clay I make enough clay to make one to two dolls. I never mix a lot at a time, it depends on the mood or colour I am trying to achieve for the piece I am creating. I the start making a head, if she is opened eye I also have a pair of eyes that I make that are inserted in the clay while forming her face. Once her face is completed I then start with my armature, by twisting wires to form a skeleton. Now the size of the armature depends on the size of her head. Or you may have a certain scale you want to work with but the process is still the same for me.
I then start adding clay to the armature pushing, forming and cutting away clay as I go, sometimes I have them in the position I want them in and at times I move them around while I am working. Once she is completed and I am happy with her positioning she then gets fired to set the clay. At this point you must follow the manufacture’s guide in the back of the clay package. Making sure of the thickness of the clay and the direction to ensure proper cooking time.
After the piece is cooled off you can either have her blushed while she as in the cooking process, or you can blush her with heat set paints and lightly set the paints with a heat gun, that is made for the paints.
Finally I do the makeup, clothing and lastly I do hair.

**Overall it take me between 5 to 7 days working at least 7 hours a day to complete one.**

Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio Tears of a Clown D by cdlitestudio Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio

What tools did you use?


My studio is off side my home, it used to be a garage, but slowly got invaded, by little old me . And now it is permanently converted in to my studio.
As for tools, the best I found was my hands and the tools I have made myself.


What was your inspiration in creating this?


WOW this piece was inspired by two amazing artist ) that gave me their blessings to create magic and these two wonderful artist are  :iconkath-13: and her awesome USOA Usoa by Kath-13 and :iconainhoart: and her awsome works Queen on Parade :thumb98759563:

Thanks to these two women... Tears of a Clown came to be


How long time did it take you to make this?


It normally takes me from 5 to 7 days to make a piece. I start first thing in the morning, around 8:30 9:00 and work my way threw to 4:00 everyday. So if she speaks to me it can be done in 5 days. I work with emotions, so I can not rush it. My DH always says I work for a pennies, a penny an hour!!!

Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio Tears of a Clown D by cdlitestudio Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating?


When I created her I had no problems at all, she came very easy to me, I knew exactly how I wanted her to sit and her expressions. Her outfit and hair came about... thanks to two artist that inspired me... For the hair :iconkath-13: and her awesome USOA
kath-13.deviantart.com/art/Uso… and for the body painting clothing :iconainhoart: and her awesome works Queen on Parade ainhoart.deviantart.com/art/Qu…
I emailed them both and they graciously gave me their permission so my piece could come to life.


Are you happy with the result?


Am I happy?? YES of course, but as an artist we think we can always have room to grow. But overall yes I am very very happy with her.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


My Dad was an amazing artist, what that man could do on paper and his art nouveau metal sculptures, were just incredible. He was just amazing, I’ll just say the artistic bloodline runs in our family, way back and still going forward. We are all very artistically blessed in our family. So what ever we set out to try and do, it pretty much comes easy. But with every thing we do we only get better as we do it. So yes I am self-taught

Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio Tears of a Clown D by cdlitestudio Tears of a Clown B by cdlitestudio

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


Yes I do take all my own photo’s. I am not a very good photographer, I think I might have to look into taking some classes. So I take many pictures using different lightings, and I keep taking them till I get that perfect, well perfect in my eyes, and good enough picture that speaks for my piece.

I think it’s important that you grab the right photo, it’s not just a piece you sculpt, but when presenting it you want to make others see the piece the way it is intended to be viewed and seen.


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


I say don’t give up, it isn’t the easiest medium to use. Don’t use the clay right out of the package, get creative and mix your own colours. Make a strong armature and the words is PRATICE! The more you will do the better you will get. Believe me I am still learning and growing everyday.


Are you selling your work?


Yes I am selling my work, I sell on ebay you will find them on auction,  you can search me there under cdlite. I also sell off my site www.cdlitestudio.com and do commissions.

More photos: www.cdlitestudio.com/215cccc.j… www.cdlitestudio.com/215bbb.jp… www.cdlitestudio.com/215a.jpg

Tears of a Clown A by cdlitestudio Swan Lake Insp. The Last Dance by cdlitestudio

Mature Content

Pink Mermaid AA by cdlitestudio
Broken Doll B by cdlitestudio The Fawn by cdlitestudio Queen Of Hearts F by cdlitestudio Alice in wonderland piece by cdlitestudio Cheshire cat faerie C by cdlitestudio

Thank you cdlitestudio for participating and taking the time to answer my question!

//Myana

I'd love to recive suggestions for next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle
The blueprint of... 30 full view
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon
The blueprint of... Leather corset
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor
The blueprint of... corset with gussets
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1
The blueprint of... Tsuru
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts
The blueprint of... Snekkja
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited
The blueprint of... More Vessels
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon
The blueprint of... Armor
The blueprint of... Shrimp

Meet the new me

Journal Entry: Wed Jul 29, 2009, 12:18 PM



New avatar

Changing my avatar for the first time in four years..
Good idea or bad idea?

:iconmyana:


Edit:
My previous avatar was taken from Wood and blood by Myana
this avatar is taken from Madness by Myana



The Blueprint of...

I hope you didn't miss the latest article inte this serie  The blueprint of... Shrimp

Please send me suggestions on deviations you want to see dissected!





Recent AC fav's

Chocolate-Covered Raspberries by bittykate Rhodespottery1025 by rhodespottery 'Lyla'  ooak fairy by AmandaKathryn Red leather necklace by julishland


journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue

No more fulltime mom

Journal Entry: Mon Jul 27, 2009, 11:03 AM



Going back to work

I'll start working again in two weeks, half-time. It feels both fun, exciting and sad. Can't believe how fast time has gone by - Svante is nine months old already!

Now let's hope the financial crisis is starting to blow over! It's been hard to the carpentry I work at and I can only hope they don't have to fire me due to that... :fingerscrossed:
But in the mean time, I will hopefully start to submit woodworking deviations soon!


Svante is a bundle of joy, a happy little boy who is crawling like crazy and love to explore his world. Keeping me rahter busy though... ;)
He got his first tooth abouth 3 weeks ago, sooo cute!

:thumb131092110: :thumb131093103:





The Blueprint of...

I hope you didn't miss the latest article inte this serie  The blueprint of... Shrimp

Please send me suggestions on deviations you want to see dissected!







journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue
The blueprint of... is an article serie where we’re taking a closer look on an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Shrimp by YAGGOB




Shrimp 'INSTRUCTIONS' by YAGGOB .Shrimp by YAGGOB Shrimp 'INSTRUCTIONS' by YAGGOB


First off, please introduce yourself?


Hello my name is Yago Braojos, I am 32 years, I am from Mexico City, I love graphic design and visual arts and in all its forms. Including painting, photography and the art of origami.


Please explain what we are viewing.


In my deviation you can appreciate the beautiful art of origami, the size of each figure may change depending on the size of the sheet of paper used, I personally I like to create insects, reptiles and creatures created by my imagination. You'll also be seeing several paintings in different techniques and crafts and mode shapes with different materials.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


How to make is to create some kind of figure using a simple square piece of paper without cutting or pasting, folds using specific angles, the figure comes alive gradually till reaching its final result (so-called collapse). Shaping a figure trying to achieve the greatest possible realism in it, or whatever it is, the staffing of the establishment in both volume and the most outstanding features of a particular animal or insect. The paper or material to use will depend on the figure, for example to insects is convenient to use a very thin and large paper, by the fact that the collapse will require a base of many layers of paper, one above the other, and will easily be able to bend and shape better in the end if itis not as thick. The more complex a figure, the bigger or thinner the paper has to be and on the contrary it is a simple figure to use the paper can be anyone.

Speaking a little about the techniques used in origami there for me to make two figures, one is the traditional technique or what I call technical polygon, which consists in creating the step by step without any trace from the beginning simply be following steps one after another. And there is the technique called box-pleating, which is one of the techniques I like and I use in my drawings, which consists of a sheet of tracing from the beginning and go on the road collapsing (folding), each bit line by little till reaching base after the collapse simply give a final model to that figure. In this technique of folding the figures are much more realistic than the first technique (polygon) but if it is somewhat more laborious.

Shrimp 'INSTRUCTIONS' by YAGGOB .Shrimp by YAGGOB Shrimp 'INSTRUCTIONS' by YAGGOB

What tools did you use?


Well since the only tools I use is a sheet of paper, and my own hands, you also can use other materials to give a final finish to your figure as spray coating, or what is called methylcellulose is used with a kind of glue, which is a liquito make your figure a bit stiff so that if needed, and good is a job that can be done at home or anywhere.

What was your inspiration in creating this?


When I took shapes by folding a little over a year and a half, the first time I found this mode of creation, it was seeing a link on this page Deviant ART, browsing galleries showing some figures in origami insects , reptiles and all sorts of figures, then woke up my interest to try to make figures, other figures of the first bending creators through diagrams and gradually I was creating my own shapes.


How long time did it take you to make this?


The time it takes you to a figure will always depend on their complexity, can take from a few minutes to several hours or sometimes days till.

Shrimp 'INSTRUCTIONS' by YAGGOB .Shrimp by YAGGOB Shrimp 'INSTRUCTIONS' by YAGGOB

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating?


Always when creating a shape or design it challenges and I find new things to learn, and my good design method is based on trial and error. Almost never when designing a new figure you get the expected results, something is going correcting errors, till you get the result you expected. In some cases there is not much to fix. Well that also depends on time and the experience acquired one.


Are you happy with the result?


In most cases if you are satisfied with the result obtained in other cases it is possible that something you have not tried to do it as you want from the start, but you can change or do something else with it entirely differently from the thought at the beginning, it is important to know that for this type of design or development is required to exercise much imagination and creative skills.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


For in the field of origami'm completely self taught, as well as painting and other areas. I study graphic design.

Shrimp 'INSTRUCTIONS' by YAGGOB .Shrimp by YAGGOB Shrimp 'INSTRUCTIONS' by YAGGOB

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


I always take my own photos and I try to always take the best angles and the use of lights and a background that contrasts with the color of the picture taken, and the best photos will be fine with a good camera or using a tripod to avoid blurring.


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


My first advice would be to practice and make double figures of other authors, and created, through diagrams, starting with simple shapes and be sobered up somewhat the complexity of them and is taking lessons in this art and bit to know little about the types and technical language used in it. So who knows maybe one day get to create something for ourselves.


Are you selling your work?


So if someone calls, of course, gladly!



More photos of the shrimp: www.flickr.com/photos/yagoriga…

Camel Spider by YAGGOB Longhorn Spider-beetle. by YAGGOB Ranita _frog by YAGGOB .HOUSEFLY by YAGGOB Cyclommatus Imperator Boileau. by YAGGOB Tiger Beetle by YAGGOB Devil's Coach-horse Beetle by YAGGOB .Mud Dauber Wasp. by YAGGOB

Thank you YAGGOB for participating and taking the time to answer my question!

//Myana

I'd love to recive suggestions for next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle
The blueprint of... 30 full view
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon
The blueprint of... Leather corset
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor
The blueprint of... corset with gussets
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1
The blueprint of... Tsuru
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts
The blueprint of... Snekkja
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited
The blueprint of... More Vessels
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon
The blueprint of... Armor
The blueprint of... is an article serie where we’re taking a closer look on an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Armor by flintlockprivateer




Armor by flintlockprivateer Armor opened by flintlockprivateer Armor by flintlockprivateer


First off, please introduce yourself?


My name is Josh Murray I am 32 years old and live in Los Angeles California. I have been working as a freelance sculptor for about 13 years and making jewelry for 6 years. I spend roughly 3/4 of the year working on props for movies and theme parks and what not, in my down time I make and sell jewelry.


Please explain what we are viewing.


This is a 2 piece locket style pendant with a simple jump link hinge. It is about 1 1/2 inches tall and 2 inches wide. (40mm by 50 mm) and cast in solid sterling silver.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


I sculpt my jewelry pieces from a hard, petroleum based jewelers wax that is sold in small blocks. I prefer to carve subtractively rather than build up material like you would do with clay. Once the sculpture is complete it is encased in a type of plaster called investment and fired in a kiln. This process leaves you with a mold of your sculpture that melted metal can be cast into to produce a metal version of your original design. This process is commonly known as lost wax casting. There are several methods of casting metal but since I don't mass produce my work I use an old school broken arm centrifugal casting machine. It is basically a spring loaded metal arm that has a cradle for your plaster mold to sit in and right next to it is a ceramic dish that is used to melt metals in. Once the metal is melted in the dish the machines arm spins using the centrifugal force to push the liquid metal into the mold. The mold is then removed from the machine and placed in a bucket of water that dissolves the plaster mold away and leaves you with a metal casting of your original wax sculpture. I don't know if that would make any sense to a layman but that is what the internet is for.

Armor by flintlockprivateer Armor opened by flintlockprivateer Armor by flintlockprivateer

What tools did you use?


When I carve wax I primarily use rotary bits and files and very small carving knives and chisels. The list of jewelry making machines and tools are endless and insanely expensive. I have a full studio full of equipment and the machines that I built myself are just as efficient as the ones that I paid out the a$$ for.


What was your inspiration in creating this?


being a sculptor, I am a big fan of anatomy as well as anatomical models. This piece was inspired from the old "visible woman" model kit that sits on top of my toolbox. Since so much of the work that I do is literally dictated by blueprints and artwork from other designers, when I make my own pieces I like to keep the designs fast and loose, I normally don't spend much time drawing them out. I usually do a rough sketch and then an outline to transfer onto the carving material.


How long time did it take you to make this?


It took about 8 hours to carve the wax master.

Armor by flintlockprivateer Armor opened by flintlockprivateer Armor by flintlockprivateer

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating?


I played around with a few different ways to hinge the two pieces, I first envisioned it with two small hinges on the side of the torso but I liked the simplicity of the jump link and the way it can be opened effortlessly when someone is curious about it.


Are you happy with the result?


The piece came out exactly how it was designed to. The part casts very well with minimal clean up. The only thing I am still going to add to it is a heart shaped ruby to mount in the heart. The pre cut heart shaped stones that you can find on the market do not come that small so I will have them custom cut on the buyers request.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


I am "technically" a self taught artist but I have been working in art studios since I was in high school, I learned a LOT by trial and error but the majority of my knowledge of sculpture was learned in the field by those who were more experienced then me that gave me small nuggets of wisdom over the years. I think of it as a hundred tiny paid internships.

Armor by flintlockprivateer Armor opened by flintlockprivateer Armor by flintlockprivateer

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


I do take my own photos. I don't know much about photography but I know when you make something shiny out of metal you will see your reflection in it. When I prep my jewelry to take photos I polish them with a satin finish to hide the reflection and place them in natural sunlight.


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


Math is your best friend.


Are you selling your work?


I sell my work on a made to order basis. Half of the pieces that I make are one of a kind custom orders.

Coming soon by flintlockprivateer Armor custom by flintlockprivateer His and hers by flintlockprivateer Day of the dead  skull ring 2 by flintlockprivateer Hot Rod skeleton belt buckle by flintlockprivateer Day of the dead necklace by flintlockprivateer 'devils knuckleduster'  ring by flintlockprivateer Nasty habits by flintlockprivateer

Thank you flintlockprivateer for participating and taking the time to answer my question!

//Myana

I'd love to recive suggestions for next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle
The blueprint of... 30 full view
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon
The blueprint of... Leather corset
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor
The blueprint of... corset with gussets
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1
The blueprint of... Tsuru
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts
The blueprint of... Snekkja
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited
The blueprint of... More Vessels
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses
The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon

Streamlining the Artisan Crafts Gallery

Journal Entry: Sun Jul 12, 2009, 6:39 AM



Streamlining AC

From the Community Relations Newsletter - June 2009 by Moonbeam13
- Gallery Streamlining, changes and additions:


    "I'm in the process of streamlining and will be starting with the Artisan Crafts gallery and Literature. This process is painful and can take time and could cause frustration but we will keep you updated on progress and try to keep the annoyances to a minimum. If you wish to send me coffee, I would love you long time :)"


From Kitten-of-Woe's journal Artisan Crafts Update - 7/3/2009 - Important EDIT :

Yes, that's right, the next step in streamlining and making changes to the galleries in Artisan Crafts will begin soon. I say "next step" because work has actually been going on with this for a long time and it all began when my former partner Myana started work on a proposal for change. Later on, she and I discussed it more as 2008 wore on and early this year I took a very close and indepth look at that proposal to make more changes and also to change many gallery descriptions. If you have any ideas or suggestions, now is the time to be heard, but please do it soon and by sending me (Kitten-of-Woe that is) a note and titling it "gallery changes." You might not hear back from me unless it's to ask a question, but all will be read and taken into serious consideration.


This is something I've worked with since Dec 2007 and Kitten-of-Woe picked up when I stepped down - and I can't tell you how happy and excited I am to see the changes!! I don't know more than you how the final draft is, but I know what we've discussed over the time and some of the changes that I hope are taking place are loooong waited and very needed.

Yaaaaay!!


The Blueprint of...

I hope you didn't miss the latest article inte this serie  The blueprint of... Copper Mech Dragon

Please send me suggestions on deviations you want to see dissected!





Recent AC fav's

Tattered 3 by ellyloo Goddess Belldandy by yayacosplay Monkion Collection by curster Woah Wedding by Heidilu22 Doll Repaint - Michael Jackson by noeling :thumb129106455: camels by lorenzou Black needlecord Buckle Coat by Supernalclothing


journal design & css by Ninina-nini & Ikue
The blueprint of... is an article serie where we’re taking a closer look on an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA




Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA


First off, please introduce yourself?


Hi! My name is Rachel Ross, and I'm thirty*coughsomething* years old. I am single, live in Ohio, and work by day as a technical editor.


Please explain what we are viewing.


This is sort of a "Steampunk" dragon, made of polymerclay, but painted to look like it is made of copper. I had fun figuring out how to make this look like it was metal.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


Well if I am making a sculpture of any size, I usually start with an armature of wire and tinfoil packed into a rough shape. For this one, I knew I would need some claws/horns so I made and baked them ahead of time. Then I work in layers, baking as I go, until I end up with the finished product. After it was done, I painted the entire thing black, then the copper color - this gave it an aged look. Green under the copper would probably have worked too.

Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA

What tools did you use?


My workshop, theoretically, is the attic - but I generally haul all the craft supplies down to another room when I'm working. Who really wants to be alone in the attic? (It's a really neat attic, but...) Anyway I'd say my favorite tools are dental tools, embroidery needles, and the clay tools that you buy at chain craft stores. But no tool really compares to your own fingertips. For this piece it was especially important for me to use a pasta machine, to make those "metal-like" smooth sheets of clay. I also used actual nails to make the rivet marks.


What was your inspiration in creating this?


I was thinking about all the "Windstone" etc. edition dragons you see in catalogs, and decided I should make a piece a little larger than my usual tiny pieces, to be more like those. Since I like Steam (not to mention, it's quite "in") I decided to work that theme into the piece.


How long time did it take you to make this?


I don't remember; I worked out the initial part and then let it sit for a long time, not knowing where I was going with it. Then when I continued, I worked on it over a series of evenings/weekends, since I work during the day.

Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating?


YES! I was not thinking when I began, and made the wing-armature a part of the body armature, so I could not detach and work on the wings separately! This made covering them with clay a real pain.


Are you happy with the result?


I am very happy with the result! The only thing I'm not sure about is the red eyes. Perhaps another color would have looked friendlier.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


Oh I'm just self-taught. When I was little I loved to play with "plasticine" all the time. The first time I picked up polymer clay I hated it - it was hard and crumbled. Then later when I tried the softer brands, learned to love sculpting all over again. But I really want to improve! I have so many areas I need to work on.

Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA Copper Mech Dragon by NycterisA

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


I am lazy, and usually snap mediocre photos; the biggest tip I have is use a very bright light source. I finally bought a light box, and, when I have the patience to use it, it looks great - I did use it on this photo. Also my new cheap camera works great. The difference between it and cameras I had in the past is: Image Stabilization. I took this photo with a big Canon SLR, but my cheap point-n-shoot works almost as well. If you have to pick one camera for this sort of work, go with an inexpensive one with IS - though the big SLR is great for "serious photography", sometimes you can get the results you want with a cheap camera too.


What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


The first thing I did was buy a massive amount (ok not that massive, probably 8 lbs) of "Sculpey" - the cheap white classroom kind. Then I gave myself liberty to play with it all I wanted, because I didn't have to worry about running out. This let me try new techniques. I don't know why, but I am paranoid about running out of craft supplies, and have a big tendency to stockpile them.
I do not use "Sculpey" very much now; I use mostly either Sculpey III or Premo, Sculpey Firm, or mix them together.
The other tip I have is "buy cheap clay and then paint it the color you want" works just as well as buying the actual tiny blocks of color you want.


Are you selling your work?


Yep, I sold this piece to a friend, :iconjahnoth: but if you are interested in something like it I would definitely love to talk to you. I also selll art at Artfire (glimmerville.artfire.com ) and Etsy (glimmerville.etsy.com ) which you can also get to from my website, Glimmerville.com I sometimes do shows in the area. I don't sell very much in person or online (though I'd like to sell it to you if you are interested) - mostly I make art because it is fun.

Box of Possibility by NycterisA The Fairy Garden by NycterisA To Market, To Market by NycterisA Red and Green by NycterisA Forest and Sea in Sun by NycterisA Green and Black Polymer Tile by NycterisA Green Foursome by NycterisA Anemone in the Dark by NycterisA

Thank you NycterisA for participating and taking the time to answer my question!

//Myana

I'd love to recive suggestions for next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





Previous articles:
The blueprint of... My Little Alien
The blueprint of... Devil Claw Gargoyle
The blueprint of... 30 full view
The blueprint of... Flying Jewel Ring
The blueprint of... Golden Chinese Dragon
The blueprint of... Leather corset
The blueprint of... Galding's Runesmith Armor
The blueprint of... corset with gussets
The blueprint of... Red Cross 9.26.08
The blueprint of... Rosemary 1
The blueprint of... Tsuru
The blueprint of... Duct Tape Queen Of Hearts
The blueprint of... Snekkja
The blueprint of... Dragon Chain Revisited
The blueprint of... More Vessels
The blueprint of... Cosplay: Belle
The blueprint of... Calla Lilly Chocolate Box
The blueprint of... Louis Vuitton Hand bag cake
The blueprint of... Red wave glass tile pendant
The blueprint of... Pharoah's Horses
The blueprint of... is an article serie where we’re taking a closer look on an Artisan Crafts deviation and how it's made.


Today we are dissecting Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios




Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios


First off, please introduce yourself?


I am Dawn Thompson, a stained and kilnformed glass artisan working in Iowa. I run Indeestudios, a glass and illustration business with my illustrator husband, John Thompson. www.indeestudios.com/ I'm also the mom of 2 boys and 3 adopted dogs, and run a food pantry.


Please explain what we are viewing.


This is a commissioned stained glass window based on the widely distributed Victorian Era print, "The Pharaoh's Horses" It is constructed with lead came, art glass and glass enamels and approximately 24" in diameter.


Can you describe for a layman how it’s made?


The initial and most important part of stained glass work is the pattern. In this case, I was taking an existing composition and re-working it to accommodate the physics of glass. There can be no sharp inside angles, no shapes with a "waist", and all shapes must have a connecting lead line. Depending on whether you are working with lead came or copper foil, you must also think about whether the shapes can slide into the metal framework created by the came; an especially difficult process when working with a circular composition.

Once the pattern is completed, it is printed at full scale and used as a template to cut the glass. Since this piece has painted elements, I used a type of glass that is acutally clear, but constructed with millions of frothy "bubbles" so it reads white. it transmits a ton of light, but has a nice opaque look. I then painted the horses on a lightbox, using a stipple method, then an overall airbrushing to deepen the blacks in the shadows.

The painted pieces are kiln fired to set the paint, then the rest of the process can proceed.

The rest of the glass is cut to the pattern, then fitted into extruded lead channel, called came. This is an ancient technique and most common in installed windows. The lead is then soldered together where it joins. This process is followed by applying a putty made of linseed oil and whiting to the entire panel, pushed between the lead and glass to strengthen the panel, weatherproof it, and cushion and protect the glass. Then it is cleaned waxed and installed or framed.

Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios

What tools did you use?


I have a rather sprawling and strange studio in the basement of my 112 year old home that houses a ton of equipment, including diamand saws, various grinders and 3 kilns! For basic cold, (stained), glass work, however, you need just a few basic tools. A good glass cutter, special pliers for breaking and refining the glass called groziers, a lead knife or lead pliers, (called lead dykes), to cut the metal, and a soldering iron. A wet diamond bit grinder is helpful for quickly refining the glass shapes. For pattern drawing, I start with sketches, then refine using Adobe CS on a Mac. I use a large lightbox for painting, and steal brushes from my husband!


What was your inspiration in creating this?


This was a commissioned piece where the client contacted me wanting a window based on "The Pharaoh's Horses". I was familiar with the painting, having seen it in several homes growing up, and having been a "horse girl" loved it, of course! It is always much more fun to create a commissioned piece that you are enthusiastic about!

horses original by indeestudios

There were two widely distributed versions of the painting; one in black and white and one in color. The original had a rectangular orientation, but it was most often reproduced as a circular piece. I drew up several variations, but the client and I decided that the modified take on the circular black and white was the most dramatic.


How long time did it take you to make this?


This took approximately 40 hours.

Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios

Did you run into anything unexpected while creating?


I've done so many windows over the years that unless I'm doing something off the wall or experimental, I can usually anticipate any difficulties. In this case, leading was difficult, since it is a circular shape, but nothing too tough.


Are you happy with the result?


I was especially pleased with the outcome on this piece. Reproducing paintings in glass is often difficult; especially if the client has unrealistic expectations. Cold glass techniques must be based on strong definitive lines and shapes, while most paintings are based on the flow and transition of color. They don't always translate well. In this case, the strong contrasts and dramatic lighting of the original painting translated nicely to glass.


Where have you learnt your skills in this area?


My art background is eclectic; I was an art major for 3 years before changing majors and graduating with a business degree. I took a 10 session class to learn the basics of cold glass work from a glass and paint shop several years ago. I am self taught in glass painting, kilnformed glass and advanced cold glass techniques, as well as digital drafting.

Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios Pharoah's Horses by indeestudios

Do you take your own photos? Any tips you want to share for presenting your work?


Anyone who has tried it will tell you that photographing glass is terrible! Fortunately, I have a sunroom with lots of natural light on 3 sides so can get decent photos fairly regularly. Windows must be photographed with strong natural backlighting. Flash is out because of the glare, though I will sometimes use it for detail shots where I want to highlight a texture.

I will often adjust the contrast and color levels in Photoshop if I can't get good light for a few days. Usually the pieces need to go out to a client, so I can't wait for that perfect sunny-but-not-too-bright day!

horses frame by indeestudios

What is the best tip you can give to others wanting to test this craft/material/technique?


I encourage anyone with an interest in glass to take a class! Most glass stores and many craft shops offer classes or workshops. The basics are easily learned with a good instructor, but difficult to learn via books or videos. A bit of a warning though....materials are expensive and glass is addictive!

If you already know the basics and wish to improve or expand your skills, I can't emphasize draftsmanship and artistry enough. Take a drawing class or get a book and learn how to draw simply and effectively. And learn compositional basics. The strong line element in glass will make defects that would be minor in a shaded drawing or painting glaring ones.


Are you selling your work?


Most of my work is commissioned custom windows, www.indeestudios.com/commissio…
but I do sell some pieces in retail venues.

I sell warm glass work, and the occasional small stained glass panel on Etsy:  www.indeestudios.etsy.com

I also sell panels and windows and regional galleries: www.otlag.com/

Horses detail by indeestudios Rabbits and Roses by indeestudios Mourning Doves in Dogwood by indeestudios Genesis by indeestudios Red Dress by indeestudios

Mature Content

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Thank you indeestudios for participating and taking the time to answer my question!

//Myana

I'd love to recive suggestions for next "victim" to interview! Note me with a link to the deviation you'd like to know more about and I'll contact the deviant.





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